My Women’s March Experience #WomensMarch

I’ve been conflicted about a number of things lately. One thing is where America and the world are headed in terms of our values and policies.

I was stunned when I learned that someone who openly bragged about assaulting women was elected the president of what was once considered the most powerful nation in the world. But at the same time it reaffirmed a lot of my beliefs about how resistant many people (both men and women) are to allowing a woman to be in charge — even when she’s the most qualified and sane candidate.

So when details about the Women’s March were announced, I was encouraged. I wasn’t sure if I’d make the trip myself, but I was sure to lend my support.

The night before the Women’s March in DC something told me that I needed to go. I prayed for guidance on whether I should go and eventually decided it was a MUST that I go.

I decided to drive down and since it was so last minute I was on my own. The first indication I had that the Women’s March was going to be a big deal was when I stopped at a rest stop for gas headed for DC and it was JAM PACKED with women, buses and lines.

When I finally arrived at my destination, a garage where I could catch the train into the city, it was sold out — no spaces. I started to panic a little, hoping I wouldn’t have to search for parking for half the day, but thankfully a parking attendant recommended that I try another garage. There were spaces available — yes!

When I parked and got on the train, I was met with more enthusiastic and energetic women who had the same goal as I had — to make it downtown to the March. I sat next to a young lady and struck up a conversation with her. Yes, she was going to the March and was meeting a friend. The train was soon packed with women headed there.

When we finally arrived at our destination, I believe it was Union Square, I was immediately in the thick of the action. I walked with a group of women toward the main stage which I think was the Capitol. They chanted, pumped their fists in the air and held up signs. Despite their intense energy they were extremely polite and respectful.

You see, this is what I love about women. We can be ready for a fight and still show respect and deference for others. My whole time at the Women’s March, I felt safe, protected and encouraged.

I took pictures of various signs and scenes. I wasn’t able to make it to the main stage because again it was PACKED, but I got a good view of what really makes America beautiful. Freedom of speech and expression. Women making sure that their voices were heard, just like the courageous suffragettes before them.

On my way back to the train, I saw a sign that embodies what I think is one of the most important takeaways from this event. It read “We Are the Leaders We’ve Been Looking For.”

If you don’t like how things are going in your part of the world, whether it be your country, state or town, you can choose to be the leader you want. Consider running for anything from PTA President to councilwoman to mayor or more. The main thing that holds us back is our belief that we can’t do it, so we don’t even try. If you have an interest in being a leader in your community, now is the time to start taking action. Just do it.

Love Lynn


Lynn Gilliard is an author and blogger. Her new book You Matter encourages women to know and understand their worth. She is also the author of a popular relationship guide entitled Let Him Chase YOU.

“Well-Behaved Women Rarely Make History” – What Does That Really Mean?

Marilyn Monroe is credited with popularizing the saying “well-behaved women rarely make history.”

Unfortunately, a lot of young women take this quote to mean that they should live recklessly, flaunt their sexuality, try to be “bad b*****s” and treat people with disrespect in order to be “famous” and unforgettable. That’s what the reality stars and celebrities of today are doing to stay relevant, after all.

But it’s just not true. This is just what our popular media would like young women to believe so that they will continue to consume, consume, consume. It’s a way of keeping the minds of young women clouded with these images so that they will do (or pay) whatever possible to live up to them.

The truth is that the majority of the people we see everyday in the media who have adopted this approach to being “unforgettable” WILL be forgotten. No one will talk about them 25, 50 or 100 years from now.

Let’s look at a few women who weren’t “well-behaved” according to society’s standards for women, yet held themselves to a high regard and still made history, never to be forgotten. 1,000+ years from now, they’ll still be a part of history.

Queen Elizabeth I

They called her the “Virgin Queen” because she refused to take on a husband to rule by her side as society deemed “appropriate.” She knew that if she got married, her husband would take over and she would probably be pushed to the side or even overthrown. During her rule, she led her troops to an important victory when the Spanish Armada threatened her shores. Queen Elizabeth ruled for many decades during what many call the “Elizabethan” era. To this day, many historians try to sully her name–I believe it’s because they refuse to believe a woman was able to reign alone without a man for so long. She is a great example of a woman who went against the status quo, made her own way in this world and will always be remembered in history.

Zora Neale Hurston

Zora Neale Hurston was and is one of the world’s most treasured woman writers in the history of the United States. She went to college at Howard University in D.C. She was one of the first initiates of Zeta Phi Beta sorority and joined Alaine Locke’s literary club. She studied anthropology at Barnard and Columbia University. After graduating she chose to travel the U.S. recording the stories of the interesting people she met. She took a record of African American history that few people understood at the time (and to this day) in her best-selling books Mules and Men and Their Eyes Were Watching God. Though her talent and treasures weren’t fully appreciated during her life, her legacy lives on to this day and will continue.

Eleanor Roosevelt

Franklin Delano Roosevelt (FDR) is one of the most well-known and liked presidents in the history of the United States next to Abe Lincoln. His wife, Eleanor Roosevelt took an equally prominent role in politics as the nation’s First Lady during that time. She was a champion for human rights, an outspoken voice for women at a time when women barely had the right to vote. She became known as “one of the most esteemed women in the world” and is also famous for her quote: “No one can make you feel inferior without your consent.”

Harriet Tubman

When I first heard the story of Harriet Tubman, it was hard to believe. She escaped slavery, but instead of enjoying her freedom as most people of those days did, she decided to make 13 dangerous trips back to the place where she experienced so much pain to save others. Harriet was definitely a woman who wasn’t “well-behaved” but she will always be remembered for her heroism.

There are so many more amazing women who can be added to this list, but I believe this to be a good start. So whenever you hear that saying “well-behaved women rarely make history” please keep it in the proper perspective.

Love Lynn

Lynn Gilliard is a writer and transformational blogger. She is the author of a self-help guide entitled Survive, Live or Thrive? and a popular relationship guide entitled Let Him Chase YOU.